The History of History

This series of Västerås Conversations came about by accident. A series of friends had invited themselves to stay with Anna and me over the weeks in which spring gathers momentum towards summer. Because I have a tendency to play with the possibilities of how things are framed, the thought struck me, almost as a joke, ‘What if, instead of it just being lots of people coming to stay in our spare room, we decided to call it a residency programme?’*

Once I started joking with people that we’d started a residency programme, it suddenly seemed obvious that we shouldn’t keep all these interesting guests to ourselves. Someone gave me an email address for Erica at ABF, the Workers Learning Association, and she responded with immediate enthusiasm to my suggestion of a Wednesday night series of open conversations.

It seems worth explaining the haphazard and unfunded nature of this series, not least because I’m conscious that it has ended up being almost exclusively male – and if Anna, Joar and I had set out to organise a series, rather than it being a serendipitous byproduct of the people who happened to be visiting, there’s no way that we would have allowed this to happen.

It was a different piece of serendipity that brought us last week’s guest, however. If Anthony McCann, who opened the series, is something of an old friend, then Johan Redin is definitely a new friend. He has also travelled the shortest distance of any of our guests this series.

As we explain at the beginning, I first heard from Johan less than a month ago, just after the Dark Mountain Project had made an appearance in the New York Times – and we were both slightly stunned to discover that we had ended up living in the same small city in Sweden. We soon discovered that we had arrived at a great deal of common ground, particularly around the theme of this week’s conversation, the question of how we relate to the past and how that allows us to make sense of the present.

Apologies for the poorer sound quality of this week’s recording, by the way – I hope you’ll enjoy it, nonetheless. Normal service should be resumed shortly, when we meet this Wednesday to discuss ‘The Limits to Measurement’ with Christopher Brewster.

* I realised afterwards that the idea of a spare room residency programme was one that I first picked up from Lottie Child, who was doing something similar in her flat in London a few years ago.

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