Västerås Conversations 2015: The City & The World

A city is what happens when people crowd together, living and working alongside each other, sharing the streets and the parks, the marketplaces, the shopping centres, the coffee shops, libraries and museums. A city is a crossing point, where strangers meet, where different ideas, beliefs and cultures rub up against each other, creating sparks of friction or inspiration. A city is an environment so human-made, we can almost imagine that the world revolves around humans. A city would collapse within days, if cut off from the food and fuel that flows into it, extracted from the more-than-human world beyond.

Join us this autumn in Västerås for a series of conversations about the city and the world. How do we do a good job of living together and making life work, here in our city on the side of Lake Mälaren? Can we learn from the experience of other cities around the world and from the different cultures present within our own city? Can we find new ways of working together to make this city a place of hospitality, conviviality and friendship?

Three conversations in three months

The first series of Västerås Conversations took place in the foyer of ABF Västerås (the Workers Learning Association) in spring 2014. This year, we’re back in a collaboration with ABF and the Västmanland County Museum, using the foyer of the museum building at Karlsgatan 2.

Each month, I’ll be joined by a guest who brings ideas for new ways of looking at the city and practical examples from elsewhere that might give us inspiration. The evening begins with a conversation between the two of us, then opens into a discussion in which everyone is welcome to contribute.

These conversations take place in English, but my aim is to be aware of the difficulties of language and to make use of this: by noticing the places where the words become awkward, we can slow ourselves down and think more carefully together. I want to create a space where people can think aloud and try out new ideas.

Each conversation is recorded and released as a podcast, so that others around the world can pick up on the discussions that we are having here in Västerås.

17 September: ‘The Art of Saying No’ with Matt Weston

What happens when you say no to the city council? In the case of the utopian regeneration agency, Spacemakers, what happens is that the council decides to hire you. In the city of Brighton, Spacemakers said no to the idea of a new public artwork – and ended up creating a public art school, instead. In the London neighbourhood of Cricklewood, they said no to an invitation to take over an empty shop and instead created a mobile town square, bringing people together in outdoor spaces up and down the high street.

Matt Weston took over from me as director of Spacemakers in 2012 – and this will be the first time we’ve had the chance to talk together in a public setting. I want to explore how you go about challenging the expectations of local government and official agencies in creative ways, making space for new ways of collaborating. How do we create new life and activity in the city in ways that have more in common with the spirit of hacker and maker culture than conventional top-down approaches to urban planning and development?

1 October: ‘Trust in the City’ with Ruben Wätte

What neighbourhood do you live in and what does this say about who you are? From the price of houses and apartments to the categories used by government agencies, our society ranks the areas of a city in a league table that runs from the ‘desirable’ neighbourhoods down to the ‘problem’ neighbourhoods. But the artist Ruben Wätte wants us to question this way of looking at our cities and the fantasies that drive it.

I’m a big fan of Ruben’s work, so I’m excited to have the chance to talk about it in an English-language context and hopefully put it on a few more people’s radar. In his first book, VISIT NORRTUNA, he introduces the miljonprogram neighbourhood where he grew up – and contrasts the levels of trust and confidence that exist among children there with the anxiety that he finds in the nearby villa neighbourhood of Södertuna. In this conversation, we’ll talk about how trust is built up or damaged within the city, and whether neighbourhoods that are commonly identified as ‘problem’ areas could help us question the desires that are currently shaping our cities. What if these are the places where new ways of living together in the city start to grow?

12 November: ‘Risk in the City’ with Sepideh Karami

When the Power Meet or the City Festival comes to Västerås, the city centre comes alive with people hanging out, talking to each other, inhabiting the streets as a place to be together. The rest of the time, though, the streets are mostly just a way to get from A to B. It feels like we need an official event to give us permission to use the spaces of the city in ways that people do every day in other parts of the world. Was it always like this in northern Europe, or is there a history behind this (lack of) street culture? And are there ways to start making our city streets more sociable?

The architect and academic Sepideh Karami grew up in Iran and now lives in Umeå. This conversation will draw on her research into how we find different ways of interacting in the city, as well as her own experience of moving to Sweden from the Middle East. How do we make spaces to pause in the flow of city life, pockets for being human together, and tiny changes in the way we act that can surprise us into questioning structures we had taken for granted?

All events are free and take place in the foyer of the Västmanlands Läns Museum at Karlsgatan 2, Västerås.

Doors open at 18.00 and we will be finished by 20.00.

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